How Evangelicals Are Changing Their Minds on Gay Marriage

Personally, I think it’s about time. I hope more evangelicals will take the time to meet, interact, and understand before leaping to snap judgements.

TIME

If evangelical Christianity is famous for anything in contemporary American politics, it is for its complete opposition to gay marriage. Now, slowly yet undeniably, evangelicals are changing their minds.

Every day, evangelical communities across the country are arriving at new crossroads over marriage. My magazine story for TIME this week, “A Change of Heart,” is a deep dive into the changing allegiances and divides in evangelical churches and communities over homosexuality. In public, so many churches and pastors are afraid to talk about the generational and societal shifts happening. But behind the scenes, it’s a whole different game. Support for gay marriage across all age groups of white evangelicals has increased by double digits over the past decade, according to the Public Religion Research Institute, and the fastest change can be found among younger evangelicals—their support for gay marriage jumped from 20% in 2003 to 42% in 2014.

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A History Lesson: Bayard Rustin, The Forgotten Civil Rights Leader

FROM BOYZ 2 MEN, INC.

Bayard_Rustin_NYWTS_3When you think about the March on Washington, what do you think of first? Most people would say Dr. King delivering the “I Have a Dream” speech. But very few people know the story behind the march. The truth is the whole thing could not have been done without the tireless work of the master organizer and activist Bayard Rustin.

Unfortunalty, most people have no idea who I am talking about, and that is because Bayard Rustin has been cut out of history. If you have watched as many Civil Rights movies and documentaries as I have then you know that Bayard Rustin is hardly ever mentioned.

For example, before Selma (2014) there was another movie about the march across the EdmundMarch on washington Pettus Bridge from Selma to Montgomery called Selma, Lord, Selma (1999).  Many of the Civil Rights leaders that we know and love today are in the movie including Dr. Martin…

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Charles The Kid – ‘Hip-Hop High Life’ @CharlesTheKidVI

London producer Charles The Kid releases his sophomore beat tape, ‘Hip-Hop High Life’; a six-track collection “designed to inspire innovators, dreamers and thinkers.”

After releasing the ambient ‘Ambiguous & High‘ earlier in the month, Charles The Kid ‘s unveils ‘HHHL‘, a mellow, spacey take on Hip Hop production which is largely inspired by the likes of The Neptunes and Jet Life [Curren$y‘s label].

The follow-up to the Earmilk-featured ‘FLTOR Vol. 1‘ is an expression of his ‘jigsaw’ approach to music-making. ‘HHHL‘ was created over a three or four year period: “I tend to work very freely. When the urge takes me, I create”.

HHHL‘ represents a departure from the sample-based style of ‘FTLOR Vol. 1′ for the London beatmaker. Every sound, from piano to bells to pads to flutes, is custom-made in order to convey the dichotomy between Charles’ desire to succeed as well as to retreat into his own creative space.

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Bishop White: Letter to Martin 2015

This is one of my favorite parts of the MLK season. I love listening to Bishop White tell Dr. King what’s been going on in the country

JMcBray

This year, I am honored to again film Bishop Woodie Whitereading his annual “Letter to Martin” (Martin  Luther King, Jr.) on the state of race relations and racial justice in America. Bishop White is a retired United Methodist Bishop, was an active leader in the Civil Rights movement, and continues to teach and work for racial and social justice. He is the Bishop in Residence at Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga where he teaches, preaches, and works to equip future leaders of the church for the transformation of the world.

Bishop White is a graduate of Paine College in Augusta, Ga and Boston University School of Theology. From 1969-1984 he was General Secretary of the General Commission on Religion and Race of The United Methodist Church. Elected a bishop in 1984, he served the Illinois Great Rivers Area prior to his service in…

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